Lesson Plans
   Kindergarten
   1st Grade
   2nd Grade
   3rd Grade
   4th Grade
   5th Grade
   6th Grade

Fillers
Integrated Projects/Helpers
Graphic Organizers
Classroom Management
Contact Us
Home

 


 


 

Carry and Borrow Numbers - Math Lesson Plan

 In this lesson, students will have the opportunity to use number relationships to represent information and solve problems by demonstrating an understanding of place value, number relationships, relative size, and reasonableness of answers in problem-solving situations. By the end of the lesson, students will be able to understand ones and tens place values in numbers, add one and two digit positive whole numbers that require carrying values of ten for a correct sum, and subtract one and two digit whole numbers that require borrowing for a correct result.

Carry and Borrow (or Regroup, or Trade*): A two-part lesson
Grade Level: 2

I Concepts: Place value, carrying in addition, borrowing (regrouping, trading*) in subtraction (The lesson is in two parts, which could be presented separately from each other.)

II. Objectives:
• Students will understand ones and tens place values in numbers.
• Students will add one- and two-digit positive whole numbers that require carrying values often for a correct sum.
• Students will subtract one- and two-digit whole numbers that require borrowing (regrouping, trading*) for a correct result.

III. Materials:
• Optional - portable "sandwich board" white board that extends to
the floor, so the class can sit in a semicircle around it
(otherwise, use the classroom board while students sit in desks)
• Baskets (2)
• Large numbers (plastic, paper, or wood)
• Carry and Borrow (Regroup. Trade In*) song (for teacher's
reference)
• Dienes blocks - longs and units
Part One
• Practice papers with two addition problems each
• Worksheets of colored paper with addition problems
Part Two
• Practice papers with two subtraction problems each
• Worksheets of colored paper with subtraction problems
IV. Procedures, Part One - Carry:
A. Introduction
1. Show students the basket and ask what it is and what it's used for (carrying).
2. Place numbers in the basket and explain that they will be carrying numbers.
B. Learning activities
1. Review an addition problem such as 4 + 5. Line one number under the other and say, "You add numbers in line."
2. Write an addition problem (such as 4 + 6) with a sum of 10. When the students correctly say "ten," say, "You get a sum that's greater than nine."
3. Write the sum off to the side and explain that the 0 is in the ones place and the 1 is in the tens place. There are no ones and one ten.
4. Say to the students, "When you add numbers in line, and you get a sum that's greater than nine, what do you do?"
5. Demonstrate by writing 0 while saying, "Put the ones under the line." Explain that 4 and 6 are in the ones place, so the 0 goes under them.
6. Demonstrate by writing 1 while saving, "Carry all the extra tens to the left."
7. Write an addition problem such as 14 + 7. Ask the students how many ones and how many tens there are in the two-digit number (14).
8. Tell the students, "We're going to learn a carrying song."
9. Sing and have the students repeat, "When you add numbers in line." Ask, "What do you get?"
10. Ask, "Is it greater than nine?" Sing and have the students repeat, "And you get a sum that's greater than nine."
11. Ask, "What do you do?" Sing and have the students repeat, "Put the ones under the line."
12. Ask, "Then what do you do?" When the students respond with "carry," sing and have them repeat, "And carry, carry, carry."
13. Show that they must carry their numbers to the top of the left, because there's more to add. Sing and have the students repeat, "Carry, carry." "Carry all the extra tens to the left." "Carry, carry, carry."
14. Finish the problem.
15. Practice the song together. Some suggested motions (be sure students have plenty of "self space" for action):
• When you add - Index fingers make a "+"
• Numbers in line - Right hand above left hand, fingers together, palms out
• And you get a sum that's greater than - Extend arms out
to the sides
• Nine - Hands in front of body with nine fingers extended
• Put the ones - Hold up right hand, fingers together, palm out
• Under the line - Place left arm horizontally above right hand
• And carry, carry, carry - Cup right hand and "carry" left hand to the left for each "carry"
• Carry, carry - Do carrying motion once for each "carry"
• Carry all the extra tens to the left - Hands in front of
body, fingers extended, palms out; make curved motion left and up
• Carry, carry, carry - Do carrying motion once for each "carry"

C. Conclusion
With basket in hand, ask students what they learned.
(When, what, and where do they carry?)

D. Extension
1. Pair up the students. Give each pair a practice sheet with two addition problems.
3. Each student does a problem, coached by the other student in the pair.

V. Evaluation
Students select an addition worksheet in the paper color they like and individually do the problems.

VI. Procedures, Part Two - Borrow (Regroup, Trade*);
A. Introduction
1. Select two students (tens and ones)
Give numbers to the tens student. Give the empty basket to the ones student.
2. Ask how the ones student can get numbers. Elicit “borrow”
3. Have the ones student borrow from the tens student. ( A language arts extension would be to clarify “lend” and “borrow”.

1. Select two students (tens and ones). Give long Dienes blocks in a basket to the tens student. Give one unit block in a basket to the ones student.
2. Ask how the ones student can get more units. Elicit the tens giving a long to the ones. Say, “We take one long group from the tens and give it to the ones”
3. Explain that the one long group can be cut into ten units. Exchange the long for ten units. Say, “We regroup (or trade in) one ten into (for) ten ones.”

B. Learning activities
1. Write subtraction problems such as 9 - 8 and 18-7. Show
that the bigger number is above the smaller number. Finish the problems.
2. Write a subtraction problem such as 15 - 6. Show that the 5 has "ten more on the left to give you all of 15." That makes the top number bigger so you can subtract. Finish the problem.
3. Write a subtraction problem such as 45 - 9. Ask, "To subtract a bigger number from a smaller number, what do you need?"
4. Say, "You need ten more to give you it all," and write a small 1 to the left of the 5. Say, "We have all of 15 now."
5. Ask, "Where did the ten come from?"
6. Say, "We borrowed (regrouped, traded*) one ten from the left, from the tens place." Cross through the 4.
7. Say, "We borrowed (regrouped, traded*) one ten. How many tens do we have in the tens place now?"
8. After the students say, "Three," say, "So, we need to remember that's one less ten on the left."
9. Do the subtraction from right to left.
10. Write a subtraction problem such as 53 - 18.

C. Conclusion
With the empty basket in hand, ask students what they learned. (When, what, and from where do they borrow? What must they remember?)

With the two baskets in hand, ask students what they learned about groups. (How do they regroup or trade? What must they remember?)

D. Extension
1. Pair up the students. Give each pair a practice sheet with two subtraction problems.
2. Each student does a problem, coached by the other student in the pair.

VII. Evaluation
Students select a subtraction worksheet in the paper color they like and individually do the problems.
 

 

Download complete lesson plan PDF's in the upper right corner of each page.
 
Lesson Plans    Contact Us    Home
©2007 K6edu.com
 


 

 

Download:
Carry and Borrow
Numbers PDF

 

 

sitesforteachers.com

 

Support K6edu.com
Submit Your
Lesson Plans To


Please Original Work Only - No Copyright
or Stolen Material


 For Comments &
Questions Please

Contact Us